9 Online Summer Camps to Keep Kids Busy (and Learning) While School’s Out | Common Sense Media

OK, don’t laugh. Virtual summer camps — where kids head to the computer instead of the pool or park — are a thing now. And before you say, “Over my dead body,” these aren’t the solitary, sedentary, screen-centered experiences you fear. Plenty of virtual summer camps offer kids the chance to make projects, investigate ideas, and explore the world. And many are free.Going to camp online can also give kids something unique: individual attention. You, a babysitter, a grandparent, or even an older sibling ac

Read on: 9 Online Summer Camps to Keep Kids Busy (and Learning) While School’s Out | Common Sense Media

Catfishing Apps Let Kids Fake Everything from Texts to Tweets | Common Sense Media

From Shakespeare to TV sitcoms, the idea of pretending to be someone you’re not never gets old. In the online world, there’s a name for it — “catfishing” — and it’s common enough to have inspired a movie and a TV show. But creating a false persona isn’t the only bait-and-switch game out there. New apps let kids boost, create, or totally fabricate reality, tapping into the pressure kids feel to project a certain public image. Teens are especially vulnerable, since a lot of their social lives play out onlin

Read on: Catfishing Apps Let Kids Fake Everything from Texts to Tweets | Common Sense Media

The Best Way to Fight With a Teenager – The New York Times

When raising teenagers, conflict usually comes with the territory. A growing body of research suggests that this can actually be a good thing. How disagreements are handled at home shapes both adolescent mental health and the overall quality of the parent-teenager relationship. Not only that, the nature of family quarrels can also drive how adolescents manage their relationships with people beyond the home.In looking at how teenagers approach disputes, experts have identified four distinct styles: attacking, withdrawing, complying and problem solving.

Source: The Best Way to Fight With a Teenager – The New York Times

Wow. Just…wow.

I couldn’t resist posting this quote from a New York Times article:

Meanwhile, in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” program, Mr. Trump described himself as the person he listens to most on foreign policy.

“I’m speaking with myself, number one, because I have a very good brain and I’ve said a lot of things,” Mr. Trump said.

The more he speaks, the scarier it gets.

 

 

Science Says: Video Games May Improve Cognitive Abilities In Multiple Sclerosis Patients – Consumerist

“Video games will rot your brain,” is something I used to hear as a child. It’s not true, and in fact a newly published study claims that some video games may actually be helpful for the more than 2 million people around the world with Multiple Sclerosis.The study, published in the Journal Radiology by researchers from Sapienza University in Rome, looked at the effect of so-called “brain-training” games on the cognitive abilities of MS patients, and found that these games can strengthen players’ neural connections.

Source: Science Says: Video Games May Improve Cognitive Abilities In Multiple Sclerosis Patients – Consumerist

We’re Thinking About ADHD All Wrong, Says A Top Pediatrician : NPR

Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are up around 30 percent compared with 20 years ago. These days, if a 2-year-old won’t sit still for circle time in preschool, she’s liable to be referred for evaluation, which can put her on track for early intervention and potentially a lifetime of medication.In an editorial just published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, Dimitri Christakis argues that we’ve got this all wrong. He’s a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington and the director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Children’s Hospital in Seattle.

Source: We’re Thinking About ADHD All Wrong, Says A Top Pediatrician : NPR Ed : NPR

Immune System Reset May Halt Multiple Sclerosis Progression

Three-year results from a clinical trial suggest that depleting and then re-establishing the immune system can alleviate a type of early-stage multiple sclerosis.

MS is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the central nervous system. It results in damage to nerve fibers, disrupting communication between the brain and the body. The disease’s widely varying symptoms can include tingling or numbness in extremities, motor and speech difficulties, weakness, fatigue, chronic pain, vision loss, and depression.

The most common form of MS is relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), in which periods of mild or no symptoms are interspersed with periods of more severe symptoms, called relapses. RRMS can change into a progressive form where symptoms worsen over time without any symptom-free periods. RRMS can be treated with medications that suppress the immune system and reduce inflammation. However, these drugs can cause serious side effects.

Source: Immune System Reset May Halt Multiple Sclerosis Progression

What should parents know about Instagram?

Kids and teens love using the photo-sharing app Instagram because it lets you apply cool effects and captions to your photos and videos and easily share them across a number of social media platforms. The ability to quickly change the look of your pics by adding anything from borders to blurring to brightness not only unleashes kids’ creativity, it kinda makes their lives look a little more awesome.

Source: What should parents know about Instagram?

3 Kinds of Apps That Stir Up Drama in Schools | Common Sense Media

If your kid is among the 73% of teens who have access to a smartphone, you’re well aware of the app obsession that can take over a brain and body in seconds. Multiply that by the average student population at your middle or high school, and you see the problem many schools are facing this back-to-school season. For teens, smartphones + apps = social networking. And where there’s social networking, there’s sure to be drama.

Source: 3 Kinds of Apps That Stir Up Drama in Schools | Common Sense Media