9 Online Summer Camps to Keep Kids Busy (and Learning) While School’s Out | Common Sense Media

OK, don’t laugh. Virtual summer camps — where kids head to the computer instead of the pool or park — are a thing now. And before you say, “Over my dead body,” these aren’t the solitary, sedentary, screen-centered experiences you fear. Plenty of virtual summer camps offer kids the chance to make projects, investigate ideas, and explore the world. And many are free.Going to camp online can also give kids something unique: individual attention. You, a babysitter, a grandparent, or even an older sibling ac

Read on: 9 Online Summer Camps to Keep Kids Busy (and Learning) While School’s Out | Common Sense Media

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Catfishing Apps Let Kids Fake Everything from Texts to Tweets | Common Sense Media

From Shakespeare to TV sitcoms, the idea of pretending to be someone you’re not never gets old. In the online world, there’s a name for it — “catfishing” — and it’s common enough to have inspired a movie and a TV show. But creating a false persona isn’t the only bait-and-switch game out there. New apps let kids boost, create, or totally fabricate reality, tapping into the pressure kids feel to project a certain public image. Teens are especially vulnerable, since a lot of their social lives play out onlin

Read on: Catfishing Apps Let Kids Fake Everything from Texts to Tweets | Common Sense Media

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The Best Way to Fight With a Teenager – The New York Times

When raising teenagers, conflict usually comes with the territory. A growing body of research suggests that this can actually be a good thing. How disagreements are handled at home shapes both adolescent mental health and the overall quality of the parent-teenager relationship. Not only that, the nature of family quarrels can also drive how adolescents manage their relationships with people beyond the home.In looking at how teenagers approach disputes, experts have identified four distinct styles: attacking, withdrawing, complying and problem solving.

Source: The Best Way to Fight With a Teenager – The New York Times

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We’re Thinking About ADHD All Wrong, Says A Top Pediatrician : NPR

Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are up around 30 percent compared with 20 years ago. These days, if a 2-year-old won’t sit still for circle time in preschool, she’s liable to be referred for evaluation, which can put her on track for early intervention and potentially a lifetime of medication.In an editorial just published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, Dimitri Christakis argues that we’ve got this all wrong. He’s a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington and the director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Children’s Hospital in Seattle.

Source: We’re Thinking About ADHD All Wrong, Says A Top Pediatrician : NPR Ed : NPR

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What should parents know about Instagram?

Kids and teens love using the photo-sharing app Instagram because it lets you apply cool effects and captions to your photos and videos and easily share them across a number of social media platforms. The ability to quickly change the look of your pics by adding anything from borders to blurring to brightness not only unleashes kids’ creativity, it kinda makes their lives look a little more awesome.

Source: What should parents know about Instagram?

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Daniel Tiger Becomes a Boy With Autism’s Guide to Social Life – The New York Times

We’ve spent thousands of dollars on therapies, countless hours at trial-and-error play dates. In spite of all that, I know just where the credit lies for my high-functioning autistic son’s new-found ability to connect with others: Daniel Tiger.“Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” from PBS, channels the wise, kind and nourishing lessons of Mister Rogers through Daniel Tiger, an ultra-relatable preschooler who dons a red cardigan and has memorable ditties for handling things like disappointment, frustration, anger or fear of the unknown. He is also big on skills like turn-taking, cooperation, problem-solving and empathy.

Source: Daniel Tiger Becomes a Boy With Autism’s Guide to Social Life – The New York Times

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Easy Minecraft Cake

For my son’s 10th birthday party, I “made” a Minecraft cake (decorating a store bought cake):Minecraft Cake

I ordered a sheet cake from Safeway with green frosting on top and edges. I made brownies, which I then frosted myself with green frosting, using a frosting tip, to simulate grass blocks, which I stacked on the left. The “lava” is orange frosting dusted with red decorating sugar.

I dug out a rectangle on the cake and filled it with blue jello to make a pool/pond. I used crushed chocolate cookies around the edge of the water, although I don’t think that was terribly successful. It might look better without it.

I lightly toasted shredded coconut and colored it with green food coloring. The paper figures are from The Ultimate Guide to Minecraft Papercraft. They were kind of tedious to make. Figure at least 20 minutes for each, and have toothpicks handy.

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Calling Young Girls ‘Fat’ May Increase Their Teen-Obesity Risk

HealthDay News — When people tell a young girl that she’s fat, that in itself increases her risk of eventually becoming obese, according to a new study.The study included more than 2,300 young girls in California, Cincinnati and Washington, D.C., who had their height and weight checked when they age 10 and again at age 19.At the start of the study, 58 percent of the girls had been told by a parent, sibling, friend, classmate or teacher that they were too fat. Those girls were 1.66 times more likely to be obese at age 19 than other girls, the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA researchers found.

via Calling Young Girls ‘Fat’ May Increase Their Teen-Obesity Risk.

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