Knitting Retreat on the West Coast

My sister’s Knitting on the Coast Retreats:

There’s still time to sign up for the August Knitting on the Coast retreat! This year there will be two Knitting on the Coast retreats, both held at the gorgeous Arts & Crafts-era St Dorothy’s Rest near Occidental. The October weekday retreat has sold out, but there are still spaces available for the August weekend retreat, which is coming up quickly, and will be held August 19th, 20th, and 21st.

You can find lots of information about the retreat, including how to sign up, on the retreat web page. If you have any questions, feel free to email me!

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Free Pattern for Knitted Felted Bowl with Bottom Welt

Materials

Size 11 double-pointed needles, preferably 5, but you can do it with 4.
Two skeins of Noro Kureyon or another worsted-weight yarn, or a bulky wool or wool blend yarn.

What Kind of Yarn?

Believe it or not, you do not need to use 100% wool (or other animal fibers) in felted items. I have used Lion Brand Landscapes yarn in one of my felted bowls, which is 50% wool and 50% polyester, I believe. HOWEVER, you should always do a test swatch on a new yarn before starting your project. If something doesn’t felt successfully, there’s not much you can do with it. You generally can’t frog it and re-use the yarn, and if it hasn’t felted, you can’t cut up the felt and use it for other things.

You can also use a 100% man-made fiber as a carry-along with the natural fiber, as I did in this bowl:

I would definitely not use any yarn with less than 50% animal fiber, though, and I would definitely do a swatch with any mixed fiber yarn. Also, do not use superwash wool. It’s been specially treated to NOT felt in the washing machine. In addition, white or off-white yarns do not felt well, as the bleach has usually destroyed the fibers to some extent.

Instructions

Cast on 8 stitches on one of the needles; distribute the stitches evenly onto all but one of your needles. Join, being careful not to twist. Knit one round. Then:

Round 1: Inc (increase) each stitch by knitting into the front, then into the back before sliding off left needle.
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3: *K1, inc; repeat from * to end of round – 24 stitches
Round 5: *K2, inc; repeat from * to end of round – 32 stitches
Round 7: *K3, inc; repeat from * to end of round – 40 stitches
Round 9: *K4, inc; repeat from * to end of round – 48 stitches
Round 11: *K5, inc; repeat from * to end of round – 56 stitches
Round 13: *K6, inc; repeat from * to end of round – 64 stitches
Round 14-19: Knit

Next you want to create a welt which will help to keep the bottom of the basket flat.

Pick up the back loop of the stitch from row 14 and put it on the left needle. Knit together this stitch and the first one that was already on the left needle. Repeat to the end of the round. Note: If you want to do the welt in a different color, which can look really nice, switch colors at round 14 and switch back after the welt round.

Keep knitting in the round till the bowl is about 2 1/2 – 3″ long from the base. Bind off.

Finishing

Cut yarn, leaving about an 8? tail. Weave in all loose ends. Remember that felting will make the ends virtually disappear – however, you must eliminate any largish holes or gaps by darning them before felting. Felting will not close them up completely.

Felting

Before you felt, make absolutely sure that there’s nothing in the knitting that you don’t want there permanently. In other words, stray threads or lint, etc. It will get felted into the fabric permanently and be virtually impossible to remove.

Put the bowl in a lingerie bag or pillowcase tied at the top. This is important because otherwise you could end up with all sorts of fuzz in your washing machine that takes a few loads to get rid of. Put in the washing machine with a small amount of soap, at the hottest temperature possible. Also add a pair of jeans that you don’t mind shrinking. Agitation is as important as hot water for felting, and if the bowl is in there by itself, there won’t be enough agitation.

Start the washer. Check the bowl every few minutes to see how it’s doing. There should be virtually no stitch definition left when it’s done. Keep resetting the washer if necessary. Don’t let it go into spin cycle. The spinning can stretch the bowl out. When it’s finished to your satisfaction, rinse in tepid water, squeeze out the water and roll the bowl up in a towel. Press out as much of the water as possible. Dry the bowl over the next couple of days. It’s good to put something in it to weigh it down and flatten the bottom. I use a full coffee can.

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Felted bowl pattern with welt

I am planning on putting up a pattern in the next couple of weeks for a felted bowl with a welt on the bottom. The felted bowls kind of annoy me when they wobble, so I think they welt will help.

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Ruffled Felted Bowl Pattern

ruffled_striped_bowl

Ruffled Felted Bowl Pattern

Actually, I’m not sure I’d call this a bowl if I’m being technical, as it looks a bit more like a vase, but it’s probably closer to a bowl than a vase. I’m using it to hold my reading glasses, so maybe it’s a holder. Anyway…

Materials

Size 11 circular or double-pointed needles for the beginning, double-pointed needles for the end, when the decreases begin.

Two skeins of a worsted-weight yarn approx. 50 yds per skein – or one skein of a bulky weight yarn.

Instructions

Cast on 128 stitches. Place marker. Join to work in the round, being careful not to twist the stitches.

Please note that the number of stitches left at the end of the row may not be perfect – I will redo it at some point soon. Just don’t sweat it if you don’t have the exact number of stitches.

Round 1 and 2 – Knit
Round 3 – *K1, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 84 sts
Round 4 – Knit
Round 5 – *K1, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 56 sts
Round 6 – Knit
Round 7 – *K2, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 42 sts

Knit in st st until the entire piece from the beginning is about 8″ long. Then decrease:

Round 1 – *K4, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 37 sts
Round 2 – Knit
Round 3 – *K3, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 30 sts
Round 4 – Knit
Round 5 – *K2, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 23 sts
Round 6 – Knit
Round 7 – *K1, K2tog, repeat from * to end – 16 sts
Round 8 – Knit
Round 9 – K2tog until end of round – 8 sts

Finishing

Cut yarn, leaving about an 8″ tail. Using a tapestry needle, pull the tail through the remaining stitches on the needle. Weave in all loose ends. Remember that felting will make the ends virtually disappear – however, you must eliminate any largish holes or gaps by darning them before felting. Felting will not close them up completely.

Felting

Before you felt, make absolutely sure that there’s nothing in the knitting that you don’t want there permanently. In other words, stray threads or lint, etc. It will get felted into the fabric permanently and be virtually impossible to remove.

Put the bowl in a lingerie bag or pillowcase tied at the top. This is important because otherwise you could end up with all sorts of fuzz in your washing machine that takes a few loads to get rid of. Put in the washing machine with a small amount of soap, at the hottest temperature possible. Use a fairly low water setting, either small or medium. Also add a pair of jeans that you don’t mind shrinking. Agitation is as important as hot water for felting, and if the bowl is in there by itself, there won’t be enough agitation.

Start the washer. Check the bowl every few minutes to see how it’s doing. There should be virtually no stitch definition left when it’s done. Keep resetting the washer if necessary. Don’t let it go into spin cycle. The spinning can stretch the bowl out. When it’s finished to your satisfaction, rinse in tepid water, squeeze out the water and roll the bowl up in a towel. Press out as much of the water as possible. Dry the bowl over the next couple of days. It’s good to put something in it to weigh it down and flatten the bottom. I use a full coffee can.

What Kind of Yarn?

Believe it or not, you do not need to use 100% wool (or other animal fibers) in felted items. I have used Lion Brand Landscapes yarn in one of my felted bowls, which is 50% wool and 50% polyester, I believe.

You can also use a 100% man-made fiber as a carry-along with the natural fiber, as I did in this bowl:

pink_felted_bowl

I would definitely not use any yarn with less than 50% animal fiber, though, and I would definitely do a swatch with any mixed fiber yarn. Also, do not use superwash wool. It’s been specially treated to NOT felt in the washing machine. In addition, white or off-white yarns do not felt well, as the bleach has usually destroyed the fibers to some extent.

Knitting Terms and Abbreviations

beg – beginning
dec – decrease
dpn – double pointed needles
K1 – Knit one stitch
k2tog – Knit two stitches together
M1 – Make one stitch
ssk – slip, slip, knit
st(s) – stitches
st st – stockinette stitch (knit right side and purl wrong side)

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Pattern for Knitted Felted Bowl with Smaller Opening

Large Shallow Felted Bowl with Smaller Opening

knitted_bowl_small_opening

This was not the best color to use, as it’s a little too dark to see well, so I may redo it in a lighter color.

Materials

Size 11 circular or double-pointed needles for the beginning, double-pointed needles for the end, when the decreases begin.

Two skeins of Noro Kureyon or another worsted-weight yarn approx. 110 yds per skein – or one skein of a bulky weight yarn.

What Kind of Yarn?

Believe it or not, you do not need to use 100% wool (or other animal fibers) in felted items. I have used Lion Brand Landscapes yarn in one of my felted bowls, which is 50% wool and 50% polyester, I believe.

You can also use a 100% man-made fiber as a carry-along with the natural fiber, as I did in this bowl:

pink_felted_bowl

I would definitely not use any yarn with less than 50% animal fiber, though, and I would definitely do a swatch with any mixed fiber yarn. Also, do not use superwash wool. It’s been specially treated to NOT felt in the washing machine. In addition, white or off-white yarns do not felt well, as the bleach has usually destroyed the fibers to some extent.

Instructions

Cast on 55 stitches. Place marker. Join to work in the round, being careful not to twist the stitches.

Round 1 and 2 – Knit
Round 3 – *K11, M1, repeat from * to end – 60 sts
Round 4 – *K12, M1, repeat from * to end – 65 sts
Round 5 – *K13, M1, repeat from * to end – 70 sts
Round 6 – *K14, M1, repeat from * to end – 75 sts

Knit in the round using st st until the the length is 5 1/2 – 6″

Decrease as follows, changing to dpn as nec:
Round 1 *ssk, k11, k2tog; rep from * to end of row – 65 sts
Round 2 Knit
Round 3 *ssk, k9, k2tog; rep from * to end – 55 sts
Round 4 Knit
Round 5 *ssk, k7, k2tog; rep from * to end – 45 sts
Round 6 Knit
Round 7 *ssk, k5, k2tog; rep from * to end – 35 sts
Round 8 Knit
Round 9 *ssk, k3, k2tog; rep from * to end – 25 sts
Round 10 Knit
Round 11 *ssk, k1, k2tog; rep from * to end – 15 sts
Round 12 *ssk, k2tog; rep from * to last 3 sts, ssk, k1 – 8 sts remain

Finishing

Cut yarn, leaving about an 8″ tail. Using a tapestry needle, pull the tail through the remaining stitches on the needle. Weave in all loose ends. Remember that felting will make the ends virtually disappear – however, you must eliminate any largish holes or gaps by darning them before felting. Felting will not close them up completely.

Felting

Before you felt, make absolutely sure that there’s nothing in the knitting that you don’t want there permanently. In other words, stray threads or lint, etc. It will get felted into the fabric permanently and be virtually impossible to remove.

Put the bowl in a lingerie bag or pillowcase tied at the top. This is important because otherwise you could end up with all sorts of fuzz in your washing machine that takes a few loads to get rid of. Put in the washing machine with a small amount of soap, at the hottest temperature possible. Also add a pair of jeans that you don’t mind shrinking. Agitation is as important as hot water for felting, and if the bowl is in there by itself, there won’t be enough agitation.

Start the washer. Check the bowl every few minutes to see how it’s doing. There should be virtually no stitch definition left when it’s done. Keep resetting the washer if necessary. Don’t let it go into spin cycle. The spinning can stretch the bowl out. When it’s finished to your satisfaction, rinse in tepid water, squeeze out the water and roll the bowl up in a towel. Press out as much of the water as possible. Dry the bowl over the next couple of days. It’s good to put something in it to weigh it down and flatten the bottom. I use a full coffee can.

Knitting Terms and Abbreviations

beg – beginning
dec – decrease
dpn – double pointed needles
K1 – Knit one stitch
k2tog – Knit two stitches together
M1 – Make one stitch
ssk – slip, slip, knit
st(s) – stitches
st st – stockinette stitch (knit right side and purl wrong side)

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Felted Bowl Pattern Modification

I should be posting the pattern for the bowl modification that was requested, with the opening slightly smaller than the sides tomorrow. I have it done – I just have to felt it.

I’m also working on a pattern for a bowl with a ruffled edge.

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Baby Alpaca Grande socks

Alpaca sock

These are the bedsocks that I knit for Lawrence’s teacher for Christmas. I used Plymouth Baby Alpaca Grande in #2567 and used a pattern from the first issue of Knitscene, although I ribbed the cuffs. It’s a fairly basic sock pattern. I call them bedsocks because they’re so thick that they’re really best for keeping your feet warm in/on bed.

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